Designing, Building and Maintaining Compliant Curb Ramps and Applying ADA in Temporary Traffic Control—Installing Accessible and Detectable Work Zones 

October 29 | Midlothian

What: Designing, Building and Maintaining Compliant Curb Ramps and Applying ADA in Temporary Traffic Control—Installing Accessible and Detectable Work Zones
When: October 29, 2019; 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Where: John Tyler Community College Campus
800 Charter Colony Parkway
Midlothian, VA 23114

Morning Session:

Facilities in the public right-of-way (including sidewalks, ramps, curb ramps and crosswalks) must be designed, constructed and maintained to serve all users.  Curb ramps are considered the basic element of accessibility.  To meet the needs of all users, those involved with designing, building and maintaining curb ramps need a clear understanding of the wide range of abilities that occur within the population and the challenges in the public right-of-way faced by persons with disabilities.  This class will introduce the ADA requirements for the pedestrian access route.  Requirements for ensuring accessibility in existing facilities versus work in new construction and alternations will be discussed.  The focus of the class will be curb ramps in the public right-of-way.  Design elements such as width, cross slope, grade and surface necessary for achieving accessibility in the public right-of-way will be reviewed.  The requirements for detectable warning surfaces at the base of curb ramps will be described.  The requirements for temporary traffic control and an alternate pedestrian access route when a sidewalk is temporarily closed for construction, maintenance or utility work will be explained.  A detailed handout will be provided, including resources on accessibility.

Afternoon Session:

Roadway construction and maintenance activities can temporarily close sidewalks and crosswalks.  Similarly, utility work, sidewalk repairs, building construction and other activities also affect sidewalks and crosswalks.  The traditional approach to temporary traffic control (TTC) has been to string yellow CAUTION tape around the work area and, sometimes, to install signs.  This is no longer acceptable.  The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Public Rights-of-Way Accessibility Guidelines (PROWAG) state that when a pedestrian circulation path is temporarily closed, an alternate pedestrian access route complying with the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) shall be provided.  The MUTCD states that “If the TTC zone affects the movement of pedestrians, adequate pedestrian access and walkways shall be provided.  If the TTC zone affects an accessible and detectable pedestrian facility, the accessibility and detectability shall be maintained along the alternate pedestrian access route.”  How can these requirements be met on the ground in terms of selecting and deploying detectable and compliant devices and ramps for an accessible pathway or sidewalk closure?

After a brief discussion of the relevant legal authorities (ADA, PROWAG, MUTCD), the workshop describes the challenges faced by individuals with disabilities as they travel in the built environment.  The basic requirements of the Pedestrian Access Route are reviewed, including width, protruding objects, cross slope, grade, surfaces and curb ramps/detectable warnings.  The requirements for the alternate pedestrian access route are reviewed.  Tools to minimize the impacts of construction/maintenance/utility operations on pedestrians will be discussed, namely: 1) phasing of construction, 2) utilizing detailed plans, 3) effective signing/communication and 4) effective barriers/barricades.  The session will conclude with an interactive review/discussion of various work zone scenarios and best practices.  Upon completion of the class, participants will be able to: 1) assess a TTC zone set-up for compliance with ADA/MUTCD and 2) design a compliant TTC zone.

Instructor: Ron Eck, Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering at West Virginia University and Senior Advisor with the West Virginia Local Technical Assistance Program (WV LTAP).

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Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Self-Evaluations/Transition Plans and Overview of Elements of Public Right-of-Way Accessibility  

October 30 | Midlothian

What: Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Self-Evaluations/Transition Plans and Overview of Elements of Public Right-of-Way Accessibility
When: October 30, 2019; 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Where: John Tyler Community College Campus
800 Charter Colony Parkway
Midlothian, VA 23114

 

With the 25-year anniversary of the passage of ADA, it is critical that local governments recognize their obligation to upgrade streets, sidewalks and facilities for accessibility. ADA requires that public agencies perform self-evaluations and prepare transition plans. They were to have been completed by July 26, 1992 and be updated periodically. The morning portion of the workshop examines the background to, contents of and enforcement of the self-evaluation and transition plan requirements. Several landmark court cases are also highlighted. A case study is presented to illustrate these items. Participants will leave the session with a “To Do” list of next steps they need to take and a toolkit of helpful resources. The afternoon session overviews the current criteria for accessible public rights-of-way including the pedestrian access route, curb ramps and detectable warnings, accessible pedestrian signals, street furniture, on-street parking and temporary traffic control requirements for pedestrians.

Instructor: Ron Eck, Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering at West Virginia University and Senior Advisor with the West Virginia Local Technical Assistance Program (WV LTAP).