Access Management

The workshop will cover the latest access design principles, access management techniques, retrofit programs, legal implications, and design guidelines. Included in the materials will be examples of State Highway Access Code and procedures for estimating the potential benefits from an access management program. Impacts on the business community will also be discussed. This course concludes with an access management exercise that will require participants to design a retrofit access plan for Leesburg Road in Northern Virginia.

    Accident Reconstruction as an Element of Rick Management

    With the growing number of claims alleging various roadway defects against roadway agencies, traffic crash investigation and reconstruction are key elements of an effective risk management program.  On-scene field personnel must be aware of the data needs of the reconstructionist to gather the perishable data required for a successful defense or resolution of a claim.  Understanding the capabilities and limitations of accident reconstruction will prepare agency attorneys to better evaluate a claim’s validity.  At-scene and after-accident investigation and data collection are discussed.  Collection techniques for roadway, vehicle, and other crash-related data are described.  Common reconstruction techniques and their applications are reviewed.

      Advanced Work Zone Traffic Control

      Federal requirements now instruct state and local governments to train personnel in work zone traffic control relevant to the job decisions that each individual is required to make. This workshop provides training needed to properly install and monitor work zones for construction and maintenance projects for long-term (greater than three consecutive days) operations. This course provides comprehensive training on work zone standards, guidelines, installations and removal procedures, inspection, liability, documentation and supervisory skills. Several workshops included in this course are designed to provide hands-on experience implementing and modifying temporary traffic control plans for various real-life situations. It also teaches how to recognize, analyze, correct, and document deficiencies. At the conclusion of this workshop, a short open-book written exam will be administered to all attendees. A VDOT-issued training card will be given to each attendee who achieves a passing grade of 80% or higher.

        Americans with Disabilities ACT (ADA) Self-Evaluations

        With the 25-year anniversary of the passage of ADA, it is critical that local governments recognize their obligation to upgrade streets, sidewalks and facilities for accessibility. ADA requires that public agencies perform self-evaluations and prepare transition plans. They were to have been completed by July 26, 1992 and be updated periodically. The morning portion of the workshop examines the background to, contents of and enforcement of the self-evaluation and transition plan requirements. Several landmark court cases are also highlighted. A case study is presented to illustrate these items. Participants will leave the session with a “To Do” list of next steps they need to take and a toolkit of helpful resources. The afternoon session overviews the current criteria for accessible public rights-of-way including the pedestrian access route, curb ramps and detectable warnings, accessible pedestrian signals, street furniture, on-street parking and temporary traffic control requirements for pedestrians.

          Asphalt Roads Common Maintenance Problems

          This course provides relevant information to individuals who have to maintain asphalt pavements. The course material reviews the importance of preventive maintenance to the life of an asphalt pavement. The material will help the student identify common asphalt distress, the cause of the distress, and the appropriate treatments. The latest techniques, materials, and equipment will be reviewed with an emphasis on repairing the asphalt distress properly the first time. Current industry standards to properly repair problems such as cracking and potholes will be presented in detail. The basics of treatments such as seal coats, micro surfacing, and overlays will be presented.

            Asphalt Roads Common Maintenance Problems & Repairs

            This course provides relevant information to individuals who have to maintain asphalt pavements. The course material reviews the basic concepts of an asphalt pavement by describing the roles of the various layers of an asphalt pavement structure. The material will help the student identify common asphalt distress, the cause of the distress, and the appropriate treatments. The latest techniques, materials, and equipment will be reviewed with an emphasis on repairing the asphalt distress properly the first time. Current industry standards to properly repair problems such as cracking and potholes will be presented in detail.  An overview of basic surface sealing operations,  such as seal coats, micro surfacing, and overlays will be presented.

            Intended Audience: Individuals who are involved in the planning and execution of maintenance work on asphalt pavements, including: street superintendents, roadmasters, public works directors, foreman,

              Asset Management

              Asset management is a strategic process for managing physical assets over the course of their life cycle. The strategy has been used in private industry for many years, particularly by companies managing significant assets such as electrical power plants and telephone networks. The transportation community is now discovering that the approach also offers a cost-effective way to optimize the performance of transportation assets such as highways, bridges, roadway signs, and traffic lights.

              Intended for transportation professionals with responsibility for planning, capital programming, maintenance and operations, financial management, traffic and safety engineering, system operation and management or information technology, this workshop provides an introduction to asset management concepts.

              Covering topics such as guiding principles, components and the process of operating and implementing a generic Asset Management System, participants will gain the basic understanding needed to link asset condition and performance to management and investment strategies. Upon completion of the class, participants will be prepared to start applying asset management concepts to their professional responsibilities.

              Instructor Lorenzo Casanova PE, Federal Highway Administration, Virginia Division, has extensive practical experience in engineering and economic analysis. “Asset management is much more than inventory control,” Casanova explained. “It’s a methodology that can be applied to any assets managed by an agency. It provides an effective way for managers to maintain and extend the life span of their assets and infrastructure while forecasting and controlling costs.”

               

                Basic Drainage

                This course emphasizes the importance of good drainage with discussions of water and its effects on roads, problems caused by improper drainage, and ways to handle these problems. It covers types of drainage facilities, ranging from ditches, culverts, subdrains, inlets and end structures. Their uses, materials, installation and maintenance as well as erosion control are addressed. It also introduces geosynthetic drainage applications.

                  Basic Work Zone Traffic Control

                  As traffic volumes increase and the need to repair and improve roadways becomes greater, so does the need to plan, install, and review work zone traffic control to effectively and safely perform the work. Federal requirements now instruct state and local governments to train personnel in work zone traffic control relevant to the job decisions that each individual is required to make. This workshop provides training needed to properly install work zones to perform daily maintenance or short-term operations. Emphasis is placed on the basics of work zone traffic control, focusing on work zone devices and how to effectively install and maintain them. At the conclusion of this workshop, a short open-book written exam will be administered to all attendees. A VDOT-issued training card will be given to each attendee who achieves a passing grade of 80% or higher.

                  Basic Work Zone Traffic Control is for individuals who have:

                  1. Direct responsibility for placement of work zone traffic control devices
                  2. Direct responsibility for field maintenance of work zone traffic control devices

                    Basic Work Zone Traffic Control Training/Towing

                    The workshop provides training to improve the safety of motorists, crash victims, and incident responders during Transportation Incident Management (TIM).  TIM is a systematic, planned, and coordinated use of human, institutional, mechanical, and technical resources to reduce the duration and impact of incidents, and improve safety of motorists, crash victims and responders.  Fundamental information is provided regarding Incident Management tools required to safely and effectively perform TIM duties to help create a safe work environment.  Participants will be informed on the use of basic practices for positioning and setting up the TIM area at a traffic incident while reducing risk to all.  This will include techniques and strategies regarding establishment of scene safety using temporary traffic control devices.  Basic temporary traffic control measures would include the use of cones, advance warning signs, etc.  At the conclusion of the workshop, an open-book written exam will be administered to all attendees.  A VDOT-issued certification card will be provided to each attendee who achieves a passing grade of 80% or higher.  Basic Work Zone Traffic Control/Towing is for incident responders, individuals who have direct responsibility for Transportation Incident Management .

                      Bicycles & Pedestrians - Designing, Operating & Maintaining Facilities for All Users

                      Many communities in the United States were not designed for pedestrian and bicycle travel. However, today walkability and bikeability are important for active transportation and are indicators of a livable community. The objective of this workshop is to equip participants with information on designing safer, more comfortable, accessible communities so that walking is a viable transportation choice for everyone, including seniors, children and people with visual, mobility and other disabilities and that bicycling is a viable transportation choice for people of all ages.

                      The class provides current information on the design, operation and maintenance of successful pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Emphasis is placed on the importance of maintaining accessibility and MUTCD compliance while at the same time encouraging innovation. Course topics covered are outlined below.

                        Building and Leading High Performing Teams

                        We can all agree on the advantages of high performing teams.  The research is clear.  High performing teams are better at innovation, have greater productivity, and use resources more effectively.  High performing teams are not formed.  They are built.

                        This course is designed to share the best insights from research and current best practices in high performance teambuilding.  The course is hands-on, including case studies, practice material, and participant discussion.  A focus is placed on applying the new skills within the work unit.

                          Career Changing Technical Presentation Development and Delivery 8-WEEK ONLINE CLASS

                          • 6.8 Contact Hours

                          Interested in shifting your audience’s attention from their iphones to your presentation? This 8-week online class will teach you how to create a collaborative learning environment where attendees play an active role in the learning process. Collaborative learning environments encourage audiences to shift from simply listening to actively sharing their perceptions and experiences.

                          Several effective presentation techniques that produce interaction and participation will be demonstrated. Each week’s learning module features skills and strategies you will use to plan, create and complete your first collaborative learning presentation. Weekly online assignments, discussions and quizzes will help to hone your abilities. Weekly modules and assignments will be completed during the week and are anticipated to require about 1 hour of effort. By the end of the course, you will be prepared to establish collaborative learning environments for all of your technical or training presentations, whether in your boss’ office, the boardroom or the classroom.

                            Communication Fundamentals

                            By attending this dynamic workshop you will learn the basic principles of communication and receive useful tips on how communication works; effective listening techniques, seeing things from a different perspective, and handling difficult people and situations. Attendees will participate in individual and group exercises designed to provide practice with some of the communication principles presented. You will leave this workshop with some new ideas to try!

                            Upon completion of the class, attendees should be able to:

                            • Identify the parts of the communication process and their importance
                            • Identify communication/personality types
                            • Identify and deliver clear messages
                            • Recognize the positive impact of active listening and body language on communication
                            • Change the tone of a message to fit the situation
                            • Manage conflict professionally
                            • Provide effective customer services through learning different communication skills

                              Designing Pedestrian Facilities for Accessibility

                              • 6.8 Contact Hours

                              Sidewalks, like roadways, need to be designed to serve all users.  To meet the requirements of all sidewalk users, designers and builders need a clear understanding of the wide range of abilities that occur within the population.  Pedestrian facility design and operation must comply with accessibility standards under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.  This workshop focuses on all current and emerging accessibility issues and the design parameters that affect sidewalk and street crossing design and operation.

                                Economic Evaluation of Public Projects

                                Decision-making has become a major aspect of the transportation professional’s daily activity. Making good decisions is no longer a luxury but a necessity. This workshop will provide attendees with an analytical framework for decision-making from an economic viewpoint. Workshop attendees will be provided with the theory, knowledge, and tools used to analyze commonly-encountered engineering problems and make realistic choices between competing alternative solutions based on sound engineering and economic principles.

                                  Effective Business Writing

                                  Through activities and  classroom discussion attendees will learn essentials for writing professional reports, memos, letters, emails, and other business correspondence.

                                  Attendees will learn various techniques that will help them convey written information clearly and concisely. Grammar and punctuation basics, formatting guidelines, and developing targeted messages are just a few of the topics covered in this class.

                                    Effective Culvert & Box Culvert Installation Practices

                                    As budgets for drainage structure replacements are decreased, the importance of proper culvert installation increases.  A public agency capable of properly installing culverts provides a valuable service to the citizens they support.  The first half of the training day provides information to increase the attendee’s knowledge on the proper installation practices and post installation inspection practices for the three-primary culvert material (concrete pipe, plastic pipe and metal pipe) choices in Virginia.  The intent of this training is to ensure owners maximize the service life of their culvert choice.  The course transitions from round culverts to box culverts for the remainder of the day.  This class explains the proper installation practices for precast reinforced box culverts. This training segment empowers a public agency with the ability to install/replace small bridges with their own assets, stretching budgets and increasing project opportunities.

                                      Extended Basic Work Zone - Two Day Training & Certification

                                      This Basic Work Zone class takes place over the course of two days. It is a slower paced version of the regular one-day workshop with more class exercises for better understanding of the details of setting up work zones; and more opportunities to talk about solutions to the participants’ every day work zone issues for better understanding.

                                      Federal requirements now instruct state and local governments to train personnel in work zone traffic control relevant to the job decisions that each individual is required to make. This workshop provides training needed to properly install and monitor work zones for construction and maintenance projects for long-term (greater than three consecutive days) operations. This course provides comprehensive training on work zone standards, guidelines, installations and removal procedures, inspection, liability, documentation and supervisory skills. Several workshops included in this course are designed to provide hands-on experience implementing and modifying temporary traffic control plans for various real-life situations. It also teaches how to recognize, analyze, correct, and document deficiencies. At the conclusion of this workshop, a short open-book written exam will be administered to all attendees. A VDOT-issued training card will be given to each attendee who achieves a passing grade of 80% or higher.

                                        Fundamentals of AutoCAD Civil 3D

                                        • 20.4 Contact Hours

                                         Description:

                                        This three day class is designed to give the student an introduction/refresher in AutoCAD as well as an understanding of the fundamentals of Autodesk AutoCAD Civil 3D. Familiarity and experience with AutoCAD helpful but not necessary. Exercises will be assigned along the way with a 50/50 mix of hands on and lecture.

                                        Note to UVA CEE Students: This short course compliments and greatly extends the AutoCAD Civil 3D experience that you have gained or will gain in courses such as CE 2010, CE 3400, and CE 4991.  The course is ideally suited for students wishing to gain a proficiency in AutoCAD Civil 3D to compete for internships and entry-level positions.

                                          Fundamentals of Traffic Engineering

                                          This course is intended to provide an overview of traffic engineering fundamentals. A one-day course on this topic can address a wide range of areas upon which additional continuing education can be built. Therefore, this course can serve as a refresher for the experienced traffic engineer as well as a foundation for the less-seasoned traffic engineer or engineering technician. The course material is grouped into four general topics: traffic control and management, traffic engineering studies, safety studies, and capacity and level-of-service analyses. An introduction will preface the material, and a summary and review of available resources will be provided at the end of the day.

                                          The objective of this course is to provide fundamental knowledge in traffic engineering. At the end of this course, participants will be able to understand principles applied in the traffic engineering as well as related engineering studies. 

                                            Highway Safety Fundamentals

                                            • 6.8 Contact Hours

                                            This one-day course covers the highlights of conducting a highway safety study.  The first portion of the course presents how to find hazardous and promising sites where our limited safety budget can do the most good.  The second portion of the course discusses how to select countermeasures for the selected sites with an eye on cost-effectiveness.  The final portion of the course shows how to evaluate the countermeasures that have been put in place so that we build our knowledge base and can make better future decisions.  The course will present new techniques, including the Highway Safety Manual, but no advanced knowledge of statistics or traffic engineering is needed.

                                              Hydraulic Modeling II-Applications of HEC-RAS: Free Introductory Webinar

                                              Register now for  a FREE 20 minute webinar overview of material to be presented at the one day, in-person training taking place on October 13th in Charlottesville – Intermediate Hydraulic Modeling II: Applications of HEC-RAS – a hands-on workshop focused on transportation-based applications of the hydraulic modeling software, HEC-RAS.

                                                Hydraulic Modeling II: Applications of HEC-RAS

                                                The University of Virginia invites you to attend a hands-on workshop focused on applications of the hydraulic modeling software, HEC-RAS. By working through seven different applications throughout the day, participants will become familiar with relevant model tools as well as develop modeling skills applicable to a range of hydraulic analyses that can impact transportation design. Workshop applications include: (1) incorporating survey data to modify channel geometry; (2) calibrating a model using known water surface elevations; (3) designing a stream crossing through model iteration; (4) running a multiple opening stream crossing analysis; (5) computing bridge scour; (6) exploring RAS Mapper for results analysis and visualization; and (7) building a 1D hydraulic model in RAS Mapper. A brief description of 2D modeling capabilities in HEC-RAS 5.0.5 will also be presented, including an example project. HEC-RAS tools and techniques will be discussed and explored interactively throughout the workshop. Participants will be provided with electronic files of partial HEC-RAS models ahead of time, therefore emphasizing HEC-RAS applications rather than full model development.

                                                This is a hands-on workshop so it is required that all participants bring a laptop with HEC-RAS downloaded ahead of time. Version 5.0.5 is the newest release, which is the preferred version for this workshop. Go to: http://www.hec.usace.army.mil/software/hec-ras/downloads.aspx to download the latest version a week before the class takes place. Prior experience with HEC RAS is required. We strongly recommend taking the Hydraulic Modeling: Introduction to HEC RAS class first.

                                                  Hydraulic Modeling: Introduction to HEC-RAS

                                                  • 6.8 Contact Hours

                                                  The University of Virginia invites you to attend a hands-on workshop for an introduction to hydraulic modeling using the Hydrologic Engineering Center’s River Analysis System, HEC-RAS. This workshop teaches participants how to use the program primarily through direct application, requiring each participant to build, run, and analyze their own HEC-RAS model in various stages during the day. Model components to be covered include channel geometry data, steady flow data, simulation setup and execution, reviewing tabular and graphical results, bridges, and culverts. Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to determine necessary data input requirements for hydraulic modeling, develop a simple HEC-RAS model, perform steady flow analyses to compute water surface elevations, review and analyze simulation results, and incorporate bridge and culvert geometry into a stream model. Participants will be provided with electronic files of all workshop material, including example projects and the software reference manuals.

                                                  This course is designed to include lectures and hands-on exercises with the HEC-RAS software.  Please bring a laptop with Microsoft Excel and HEC-RAS 5.0.5 download before the day of the workshop. Go to: http://www.hec.usace.army.mil/software/hec-ras/downloads.aspx.  If you are not able to bring a laptop with these programs, then you will work in pairs in class.  If you are not able to bring a laptop, you may want to bring a USB/flash drive to save your work.  Please also bring a calculator with you.

                                                    Intermediate Roundabouts Part II

                                                    This course is a continuation of Intermediate Roundabouts Part I (and a prerequisite for this workshop). The instructors will lead interactive discussions on overcoming the unique aspects of roundabout project delivery, and performing roundabout design checks and peer reviews. The course includes modules on multi-lane roundabout design, and hands-on exercises including sketching a multi-lane roundabout in a small group.

                                                    Upon completion of Intermediate Roundabouts Part I and Intermediate Roundabouts Part II, participants will:

                                                    • Have a basic understanding of roundabout applications and evaluation, including when a roundabout is, and is not, appropriate
                                                    • Understand the guiding principles of roundabout design
                                                    • Be able to perform basic design checks of single-lane and multilane roundabouts
                                                    • Understand state-of-the-practice guidance on phased roundabout implementation, accommodation of oversize/overweight vehicles, and bicycle and pedestrian treatments
                                                    • Be able to sketch a concept single-lane and multilane roundabout
                                                    • Understand the nuances of roundabout design related to vertical design, right-turn bypass lanes, and roundabout interchange design

                                                      Intermediate Roundabouts: Applied Roundabout Design

                                                      The instructors for this course will present the key geometric principles and guidelines used to develop and design a roundabout. They will highlight the differences between older traffic circles and rotaries and new roundabout design features. They will also address the typical questions of why, where, when and how roundabouts should be considered as an appropriate intersection solution.

                                                      This course includes modules on recent research on US roundabout capacity, roundabout design techniques, and hands-on exercises including sketching a single-lane roundabout in a small group.

                                                      The basis for the course is NCHRP Report 672: Roundabouts: An Informational Guide, 2nd Edition, VDOT Roundabout policies and guidance, the latest information proposed for the 2015 HCM Update, other state-of-the practice research, and the collective experience of the instructors on roundabout projects and research.

                                                        Intermediate Work Zone Traffic Control

                                                        Federal requirements now instruct state and local governments to train personnel in work zone traffic control relevant to the job decisions that each individual is required to make. This workshop provides training needed to properly install and monitor work zones for construction and maintenance projects for long-term (greater than three consecutive days) operations. This course provides comprehensive training on work zone standards, guidelines, installations and removal procedures, inspection, liability, documentation and supervisory skills. Several workshops included in this course are designed to provide hands-on experience implementing and modifying temporary traffic control plans for various real-life situations. It also teaches how to recognize, analyze, correct, and document deficiencies. At the conclusion of this workshop, a short open-book written exam will be administered to all attendees. A VDOT-issued training card will be given to each attendee who achieves a passing grade of 80% or higher.

                                                          Intersection Capacity Analysis

                                                          The Intersection Capacity Analysis Course covers the Highway Capacity Procedure for determining the capacity of individual signalized and two-way stop intersections.  The TRB Highway Capacity Manual procedures are presented as the basis of the analysis.  The relationship between capacity and level of service are discussed along with the impact of geometric configurations and signal timing.  Saturation flow and what characteristics account for adjustments needed for saturation flow are reviewed.  The capacity and level of service procedures including critical gaps are presented to the class as well.

                                                          Manual procedures for determining level of service through field observation are covered along with an HCS software analysis as well.  If time and weather permits a short field trip to observe and collect field data may be held.

                                                            Intersection SAfety Workshop

                                                            Intersection safety is a significant part of highway safety.  Intersections are intended to operate with vehicles, pedestrians and bicyclists proceeding in many directions, often simultaneously.  Given these conflicts, it is not surprising that nationally, intersection fatalities, injuries and crashes make up about 21 percent of all crashes and 55 percent of crashes in urban areas.

                                                             

                                                            There are a number of “best practice” techniques for reducing the incidence of intersection crashes.  The objective of this workshop is to reduce the incidence of intersection crashes through the application of readily-available best practices.  The focus of the session is on what can be done now through traffic control devices, lighting and geometric design applications to improve traffic safety and reduce crashes.  The results of effectiveness and engineering studies conducted across the country have been synthesized into this workshop for direct application to improve intersection safety, including reducing crashes, and traffic and pedestrian safety.

                                                              Introduction to Autodesk Infraworks

                                                              Note to UVA CEE Students: This short course compliments and greatly extends the AutoCAD Civil 3D experience that you have gained or will gain in courses such as CE 2010, CE 3400, and CE 4991.  The course is ideally suited for students wishing to gain proficiency to compete for internships and entry-level positions.

                                                               Note to All Registrants: Laptops are required for this two-day workshop. Please come with Autodesk InfraWorks already downloaded.  Please follow the link to download a free, 30 day version of InfraWorks:

                                                              https://www.autodesk.com/products/infraworks/free-trial

                                                              Description:

                                                              Autodesk Infraworks is a new generation hybrid product of CAD, GIS, Visualization, and Simulation/Analysis intended for Pre design conceptual engineering in the Civil Infrastructure discipline.  An Engineers sandbox that is extremely powerful and easy to use. Works Bi Directionally with Autodesk Civil 3D but can be used without it. The product has a very strong transportation tool set. There are really no prerequisites for this two class such as CAD experience or Civil 3D.  The class will be perfect for CAD Designers, Engineers, Planners, GIS Analysts, Project Managers, and Civil 3D Users.

                                                                Introduction to NEPA

                                                                • 6.8 Contact Hours

                                                                Any transportation project involving federal funding or FHWA’s approval have to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) before final decisions are made about actions that could have environmental effects. NEPA requires Federal agencies to consider environmental effects that include, among others, impacts on social, cultural, and economic resources, as well as natural resources. Citizens often have valuable information about places and resources that they value and the potential environmental, social, and economic effects that proposed projects may have on those places and resources. This course has been developed to help state and local agencies receiving federal funding, as well as consultants assisting those agencies, to understand the overall purpose of the legislation and its applicability.

                                                                  Low Cost Safety Improvements

                                                                  Each year, motor vehicle crashes on U.S. roadways claim more than 33,000 lives, cause 3 million injuries, and involve $230 billion in costs. The Federal Highway Administration and AASHTO, among others, have identified roadway safety as a high priority. The consequences of motor vehicle crashes would not be nearly so high if programs, tools, and technologies that have been developed were more extensively deployed to make roads safer for travel.

                                                                  This workshop emphasizes the application of traffic control devices, enhanced traffic control device application measures, low-cost safety improvements, and their specific safety benefits in terms of crash modification factors. Signing, marking, and illumination are highlighted. The information is directly applicable to addressing requests and comments from the public.

                                                                    Maintenance of Gravel Roads

                                                                    This course addresses basic maintenance techniques for unpaved and gravel roads. Topics include the importance of good drainage, surface aggregate and dust control materials, and operational techniques. These techniques include blading, reshaping, re-graveling and dust control. Driving Surface Aggregate (DSA) specifications and use are reviewed. Factors used to determine when to upgrade a gravel road by paving or seal coating the roadway are discussed.

                                                                      Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices

                                                                      This course will introduce students to the principles of traffic control devices and the fundamentals of evaluating the need for and the implications of decisions to install traffic control devices.  Students will gain an appreciation of how the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) can be used to support decisions concerning traffic control devices.  Traffic control devices are critical to ensuring the safe and efficient flow of people, traffic and goods on the surface transportation system.  The appropriate installation, maintenance and operation of traffic control devices are critical to ensuring the safe and efficient operation of these facilities.

                                                                       

                                                                      All public agencies and owners of private roads open to public travel across the nation rely on the MUTCD to bring uniformity to the use of traffic control devices.  The MUTCD defines the minimum standards and provides guidance to ensure uniformity and consistency with how traffic control devices are designed, installed, maintained, operated, and managed on streets and highways open to public travel.  Decisions to design and install traffic control devices for specific applications should be based on an engineering study and use of engineering judgment.  This ability to evaluate the need for, design, install, maintain, and operate traffic control devices is foundational to sound traffic and transportation management.

                                                                       

                                                                      States adopt the National MUTCD as their legal State standard for traffic control devices.  The FHWA released a comprehensive update to the MUTCD and adopted the 2009 Edition of the MUTCD on December 16, 2009.  The topics and material that will be covered in this course will be based on the 2009 MUTCD.  Participants will develop an appreciation for how to use the MUTCD; what are traffic control devices; signs; markings; highway traffic signals; and traffic control devices for special applications.

                                                                       

                                                                      Objectives:

                                                                       

                                                                      Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

                                                                      • Explain who should use the MUTCD and when it must be used in Virginia;
                                                                      • Discuss how the regulatory, warning and guide signs differ;
                                                                      • Describe how engineering studies support decisions to install or remove traffic control devices;
                                                                      • Discuss how to use the MUTCD when making decisions to install traffic control devices; and

                                                                      Describe how warrants are used to install or remove traffic signals or signs

                                                                        Overview of the Virginia Supplement to the MUTCD

                                                                        The Virginia Supplement to the MUTCD documents deviations from the MUTCD and adds Virginia-specific requirements. The Supplement is applicable to all roadways in the Commonwealth of Virginia maintained by the Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT).  Further, the MUTCD provisions are applicable to all private roads open to public travel, such as those in shopping centers, theme parks, airports, sports arenas, and other related types of facilities in the Commonwealth of Virginia.

                                                                         

                                                                        While all public agencies and owners of private roads, facilities and paths that are open to public travel within Virginia must rely on the 2009 MUTCD, they are encouraged to bring uniformity to the use of traffic control devices within the Commonwealth of Virginia by adopting and complying with the Virginia Supplement.  These documents contain the standards to ensure uniformity and consistency with how traffic control devices are designed, installed, maintained, operated, and managed on streets and highways open to public travel in the Commonwealth of Virginia.  Decisions to involving these traffic control devices should be based on an engineering study and judgment that considers the conditions and context specific to each application, ensuring consistency with the 2009 MUTCD, and where appropriate the Virginia Supplement.

                                                                         

                                                                        Student will develop an appreciation for how to use the MUTCD and the Virginia Supplement for signs; markings; traffic signals; and traffic control devices for special applications.  Students will also gain an appreciation of the relationship between the MUTCD and the Virginia Supplement to the FHWA Standard Highway Signs, Virginia Standard Highway Signs Book, and the Virginia Work Area Protection Manual.

                                                                         

                                                                        Objectives:  Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

                                                                        • Describe what is the Virginia Supplement;
                                                                        • Explain when the 2009 MUTCD and this Supplement must be used in Virginia;
                                                                        • Describe the organization and format of the Virginia Supplement;
                                                                        • Discuss how to find changes to specific sections of the 2009 MUTCD in the Virginia Supplement;
                                                                        • Explain where to find compliance dates for specific traffic control;
                                                                        • Explain the impacts of these compliance dates to public agencies in Virginia;
                                                                        • Identify the key changes made for signs in Part 2 of the MUTCD;
                                                                        • Identify the key changes made for markings in Part 3 of the MUTCD; and
                                                                        • Identify the key changes made for signals in Part 4 of the MUTCD

                                                                          P3 and Design Build - Half-Day

                                                                          (This is a half-day workshop; 8:00am-12:00pm) P3- Public-Private Partnerships is gaining ground in the United States. P3 is a method of procuring public infrastructure where the private sector assumes a major share of the financing and construction. Design Build is a method for project delivery in which a design-build team works under a single contract to provide design and construction services. Public-private partnerships and Design Build both have the potential benefits as projects can be completed more quickly and sometimes at a lower cost. This course will focus on the benefits (and issues) of both Design –Build Projects, P3 Projects and P3-Design-Build Projects. We will focus on successful P3/Design Build projects and how they work.

                                                                            Parking Studies

                                                                            Parking is a critical and often over-looked aspect of our transportation system.  Any glance at an aerial photo of an urban or suburban area in the US will show that parking consumes vast quantities of land.  Parking is also an enormous cost for individuals, businesses, cities, and other institutions.  There is no such thing as “free parking” of course:  every parking space is paid for in full by someone.  Parking is important from a professional point of view.  Many transportation engineers and planners have responsibilities for parking planning, design, and operation.  Parking is also a changing industry, with new concepts and technologies emerging to help those professionals.

                                                                             

                                                                            The objective of this one-day course is to show transportation engineers and planners how to conduct a parking study.  This includes how to collect needed data, how to determine the parking demand for a parcel or an area, how to establish a price, and how to design the space.  The course will also present new concepts and technologies—in zoning regulations, tax policy, intelligent transportation systems, meters, and others—that will change the way parking is managed in the future.  The course will cover many areas from central business districts to residences, with an emphasis on smaller cities and new developments where most professional activity in Virginia is likely.

                                                                              Pavement Preventive Maintenance

                                                                              This course is the first step in making your asphalt pavements last longer at lower cost.  The course covers preventive maintenance treatments such as chip seals, slurry seals, and microsurfacing and discusses when and where each technique could be effective. It presents application methods, including preparation, materials, equipment, operations and safety, along with practical tips on how to avoid trouble. We would suggest this as a prerequisite course to Road Surface Management.

                                                                                Project Cost Estimating

                                                                                The accurate estimation of costs provides a foundation for the effective development and delivery of projects. The estimate of project costs is a critical function that is conducted throughout the development and delivery of highway projects and other types of improvement initiatives on the surface transportation system. The ability to develop, manage, and control project cost estimates is a critical function that is conducted in the planning, programming, preliminary and final design, and procurement of projects.

                                                                                The escalation of costs and challenges with financing, developing and implementing highway related projects is a critical concern to all public agencies. There are a number of factors and issues that contribute to the escalation of cost throughout the project development process. Public agencies are exploring opportunities to improve how they develop, manage and control the estimation and ultimate project costs throughout the project development process.

                                                                                The ability to improve the consistency and how project costs are estimated, managed and controlled throughout the project development process is critical to the success of each project and an agency project development and delivery program. This course will introduce participants to the basic concepts, challenges and best practices with estimating and managing project cost estimates. This course will provide participants with an overview of the: 1) fundamentals of cost estimating, 2) process of developing project costs, managing cost estimates, 3) cost escalation factors, 4) deterministic and risk based cost estimating, and 5) how cost estimating varies in the project development process.

                                                                                  Project Development of Federal Aid Projects

                                                                                  State DOTs and local agencies when developing projects involving federal-aid must follow a prescribed set of rules, regulations, and procedures. This course will cover the various steps necessary to meet the federal requirements.  The course will be initiated with a discussion of categorical funds and what activities they are eligible for.  A detailed presentation will be made on how the federal highway financial system works and the process that determines the amount of federal funds that will be available to the States and MPOs.  Presentations will then be made on federal rules  to meet planning and environmental requirements, right-of-way rules and requirements (the Uniform Act), design standards, and the bridge inspection program requirements.  Federal contract requirements will also be presented that discuss a broad of issues such as use of proprietary materials, contract bidding rules, contract provisions, etc.  Class exercises will be used to demonstrate typical real life issues involving the development of federal-aid projects.

                                                                                    Project Inspection

                                                                                    This course provides State, and local inspectors with practical knowledge and standard industry practices for inspecting road-related construction tasks at project sites. This course covers the proper installation of pipe materials, as well as how to monitor earthwork, concrete and asphalt placement; including calculation of quantities for payment and documentation of workmanship. Upon completion of the course, participants will be able to:

                                                                                    • Explain the inspector’s role, duties, and responsibilities
                                                                                    • State the qualifications of an inspector.
                                                                                    • Explain the limitations of an inspector.
                                                                                    • Recognize key inspection elements of the contract documents
                                                                                    • Identify proper communication and coordination with the engineer and contractor
                                                                                    • Identify the key elements of a pile installation plan
                                                                                    • Identify important areas to monitor.
                                                                                    • Identify the different classes of bedding
                                                                                    • Identify the different kinds of pipe
                                                                                    • Accept/Reject Criteria
                                                                                    • Identify some of the key evaluation points that a construction inspector would look for on the job site.
                                                                                    • Look at the general construction process/procedures related to roadway projects.

                                                                                      Project Management Basics

                                                                                      • 6.8 Contact Hours

                                                                                      Whether involved in planning, design, construction, maintenance, operations, environmental studies, or business support, transportation professionals frequently find themselves in the role of project manager. Regardless of the type of project, knowledge of project management terminology, concepts, and the tools available to monitor and control project phases can be the difference between success and failure. The objective of Project Management for the Transportation Professional is to introduce and demonstrate essential processes and tools needed to successfully manage projects. The course will focus on the basics of project planning, project control, and leadership. Students will have the opportunity to apply principles discussed in class through a transportation case study.
                                                                                      Attendees are requested to bring a laptop PC to class with Microsoft Project (any version) installed.

                                                                                      Just a reminder that this is a hands-on course and you will work with Project Management software to build resource-loaded schedules for example projects.  Ideally, you will come to the class with Microsoft Project already installed on your laptop.  If this is an issue in terms of cost, you may also install the open source alternative “ProjectLibre” on your computers (paste www.projectlibre.org into the address bar).  This is a free alternative to Microsoft Project and will work fine for this class.

                                                                                        Project Scheduling

                                                                                        The ability to effectively develop and use schedules is fundamental to sound project management.  This class will introduce participants to the schedule development process, and also to the use of project schedules for project control purposes. Participants will gain hands-on experience with common project management practices to reinforce key concepts.

                                                                                        This course will introduce participants to the basic concepts, challenges, and best practices with establishing and managing a project schedule.  This course will provide participants with an overview of: 1) fundamentals of project scheduling, 2) the process of developing project schedules, 3) establishing a critical path, 4) potential risks impacting schedules, 5) project controls, 6) managing project schedules.

                                                                                          Public Engagement for the Transportation Professional

                                                                                          In every phase of project development, the transportation professional interacts with project stakeholders such as citizens impacted by the project, elected officials, or the traveling public.
                                                                                          Current research indicates this trend will continue. This public engagement course is designed for transportation professionals who would like to improve the quality of their communications skills. This course will review the best practices in community engagement. With a goal of improving the quality of communication skills, participants will discuss engagement demands in all phases of the transportation project development process. In this course, we will improve our skills by simulating government meetings, interactions with concerned citizens, and public information meetings. The learning environment will be interactive and fast-paced. With transportation examples, keeping the learning relevant will be a priority. Classroom response systems will be used to dynamically personalize the learning experience for course participants. Utilizing case studies, exercises, and small group discussion, participants will have the opportunity to refresh their public relations skills.

                                                                                            Public Works Maintenance and Safety

                                                                                            • 13.6 Contact Hours

                                                                                            This two-day workshop will cover an array of topics under the following modules:

                                                                                            • Roadside Maintenance Safety
                                                                                              Work Zone Hazard Analysis
                                                                                              Powerlines/Road Work
                                                                                              Power Tool Safety
                                                                                              Heavy Equipment Operations
                                                                                              Rights of Way Mowing & Maintenance/Chainsaw & Tree Work Safety
                                                                                            • Excavating and Trenching
                                                                                              Work Zone Set-Up
                                                                                              Underground Utility Locates and Hazards
                                                                                              Backhoe & Excavator Operations Safety
                                                                                              Cave-in Prevention
                                                                                            • Road and Bridge Safety
                                                                                              Temporary Traffic Control & Flagger
                                                                                              Fall Hazards and Fall Prevention Training & Equipment
                                                                                              Winter Road and Bridge Maintenance – Plowing, Anti-Icing and De-Icing
                                                                                            • Storm Preparations
                                                                                              Disaster and Emergency Preparations/Personal & Family Preparations
                                                                                              Preparing a Department
                                                                                              Forecasting and Weather Info Resources
                                                                                              Planning, Training, Equipment, Supplies, MaintenanceRoad and Bridge Safety
                                                                                              Storm Preparations

                                                                                              Risk Management 101: Principles & Practices in Construction Projects

                                                                                              • 6.8 Contact Hours

                                                                                              The University of Virginia invites you to attend a workshop on risk management principles and how they are applied to construction projects at the Virginia Department of Transportation. This workshop teaches participants how to use basic risk principles and methodologies that can be applied to any application or program. The course will review specific VDOT construction project applications, examples, and benefits. Topics covered will include group exercises, partnering principles & values, the importance of communications, trust, and issue resolution, identifying project risks, barriers to progress, developing project surveys, risk mitigation plans, performance metrics, project charters, and various other components. Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to better identify situations that arise over conflict and be prepared to resolve these issues more quickly on the job. Participants will be provided with a booklet and electronic files of all workshop material, and access to tables, spreadsheets, and databases that may aid them in properly partnering projects.

                                                                                                Road Diets

                                                                                                • 6.8 Contact Hours

                                                                                                Four-lane undivided highways experience relatively high crash frequencies–especially between high-speed through traffic, left-turning vehicles and other road users. One option for addressing this safety concern is a Road Diet, which typically involves converting an existing four-lane undivided roadway segment to a three-lane segment consisting of two through lanes and a center two-way left-turn lane. A Road Diet has many benefits:

                                                                                                • Safety–Road Diets can make the roadway environment safer for all users. Studies indicate a 19 to 47 percent reduction in overall crashes when a Road Diet is installed. For pedestrians, Road Diets result in fewer lanes to cross and provide an opportunity to install refuge islands.
                                                                                                •  Low Cost–Road Diets make efficient use of limited roadway area. When planned in conjunction with reconstruction or simple overlay projects, the safety and operational benefits of Road Diets are achieved essentially for the cost of restriping pavement lanes.
                                                                                                • Quality of Life–Road Diets can make shared spaces more livable and contribute to a community-focused, “Complete Streets” environment. On-street parking and bike lanes can also bring increased foot traffic to business districts.

                                                                                                The Federal Highway Administration Resource Center will present a workshop on this proven safety countermeasure and highlight how agencies are using this low cost safety countermeasure to improve safety, operations, and livability in their communities. Participants will be introduced to the Road Diet Informational Guide, research, as well as guided through a decision-making process to determine if a Road Diet is appropriate for a given roadway segment.

                                                                                                  Roadside Safety

                                                                                                  • 6.8 Contact Hours

                                                                                                  This workshop provides an overview of safety treatments and countermeasures that can be used to help reduce the frequency and severity of roadway departure crashes. One low-cost strategy is to use various treatments to help keep vehicles on the roadway. For those vehicles leaving the traveled way, it is important to reduce the potential for a crash, i.e., allow the vehicle to recover without overturning or striking fixed objects.  Techniques for improving shoulders, slopes and ditches are reviewed.  Removing, relocating or redesigning features such as trees, utility poles and drainage structures in the clear zone are also addressed. Enhancing mailbox safety is also covered. The session includes discussion of minimizing the severity of roadway departure crashes through use of breakaway supports and shielding obstacles. The essentials of barrier design, installation and inspection are reviewed.  The session concludes with case study exercises where participants apply what they learned to address actual roadway locations. Specific topics covered include:

                                                                                                  Nature and Magnitude of the Roadway Departure Problem
                                                                                                  Signing and Delineation to Help Keep Vehicles on the Road
                                                                                                  Rumble Strips/Rumble Stripes
                                                                                                  Road Surface Condition and Friction
                                                                                                  The Clear Zone
                                                                                                  Improving the Recovery Area, Including Urban & Suburban Roadsides
                                                                                                  Removing/Redesigning/Relocating Obstacles
                                                                                                  Barrier Classification, Types and Warrants
                                                                                                  Barrier Installation Parameters
                                                                                                  End Treatments and Transitions
                                                                                                  Basics of Barrier Design
                                                                                                  Inspecting for Common Problems
                                                                                                  Crash Cushions

                                                                                                    Roadway Geometric Design I

                                                                                                    This course is intended to provide an overview of the basics of roadway geometric design, particularly establishment of the alignment and selection of design elements and their impacts on safety.  The course material is grouped into five general topics: selection of design elements, horizontal alignment, superelevation, vertical alignment, and current topics.  The current topics module provides overviews of trends that impact safety for all users, such as the complete streets movement, traffic calming, and context sensitive solutions.

                                                                                                      Roadway Geometric Design II

                                                                                                      This course is intended to delve into topics beyond basics of roadway geometric design. After a brief review of design actors and establishment of horizontal and vertical alignments, topics addressed include roadside design, bicycle and pedestrian facilities, and safety implications of intersection design decisions.

                                                                                                        Roadway Management Conference

                                                                                                        The Mid-Atlantic (Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia) Transportation Technology Transfer (T2) Centers and Local Technical Assistance Programs (LTAP) are excited to announce the 17th Roadway Management Conference (RMC) is being held in Gettysburg, PA at the Eisenhower Hotel. The Conference dates are October 15 – October 17, 2018. We hope you can join us.

                                                                                                        The RMC is targeted to practitioners who manage, construct, and maintain state, county, and municipal roads and streets. This group includes elected and appointed officials, managers, engineers, technicians, supervisors, and contractors. In addition to a variety of conference topics we will also have companies showcasing products and conducting demonstrations.

                                                                                                        The agenda is packed with a variety of session topics, demonstrations, and opportunities to share with peers and vendors.

                                                                                                         

                                                                                                        Registration fees:

                                                                                                        Attendees:
                                                                                                        $150 – by September 15, 2018
                                                                                                        $175 – after September 15, 2018

                                                                                                        Vendors:
                                                                                                        $800

                                                                                                        Lodging: Eisenhower Hotel
                                                                                                        ($106 per night + 11% tax)
                                                                                                        2634 Emmitsburg Road
                                                                                                        Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 17325
                                                                                                        (717) 334-8121

                                                                                                          Roadway Surface Management

                                                                                                          This course provides participants with the basic concepts of road surface management including inventory, distress identification, condition survey, strategies, programs, budgets, and field surveys. A Road Surface Management Systems software demonstration will also be conducted during this course.

                                                                                                          We will first look at the reasons your roads break up and have a short review of how roads deteriorate, how they are designed.  We will then discuss the components of a Pavement Management system.

                                                                                                          Part of the afternoon will be spent performing an actual condition survey done by you on a nearby street.

                                                                                                            Safe Transportation for Every Pedestrian (STEP)

                                                                                                            • 6.8 Contact Hours

                                                                                                            Pedestrians account for more than 17.5 percent of all traffic fatalities. More than 66 percent of pedestrian fatalities occur at non-intersection locations such as midblock areas. About 16 percent happen at intersections with no signals or stop signs.

                                                                                                            By focusing on uncontrolled crossing locations, agencies can make targeted investments that address a significant national safety problem. The STEP countermeasures can also enhance the quality of life for pedestrians by overcoming barriers to safe, convenient, and complete pedestrian networks.

                                                                                                            This full day workshop will provide an overview of the pedestrian safety problem, provide some general street crossing principles, present the 3 STEP process of policy, process, and 5 proven countermeasures being promoted and available resources.

                                                                                                            The Fabulous 5 are:

                                                                                                            • Crosswalk visibility enhancements, such as crosswalk lighting and enhanced signing and marking, help drivers detect pedestrians.
                                                                                                            • Raised crosswalks are a traffic-calming technique that can reduce vehicle speeds and encourage drivers to yield to pedestrians.
                                                                                                            • Pedestrian refuge islands provide a safer place for pedestrians to stop at the midpoint of the road before crossing the remaining distance, which is particularly helpful for pedestrians with limited mobility.
                                                                                                            • Pedestrian hybrid beacons provide a stop control treatment at locations where pedestrian volumes aren’t high enough to warrant a traffic signal. They are a useful device for higher speed multilane roads.
                                                                                                            • Road diets, also an EDC-3 innovation, reconfigure a roadway cross-section to safely accommodate all users. It can reduce vehicle speeds and the number of lanes pedestrians need to cross and create space to add new pedestrian facilities.

                                                                                                            There will be a group field visit exercise where participants will evaluate a corridor and present the good pedestrian crossing features as well as make recommendations for improvements. If you wish to obtain a copy of the STEP PPT presentation, please use the following link:

                                                                                                            STEP VA April 2018.pdf

                                                                                                              Safety Effects of Roadway Design

                                                                                                              This course is intended to delve into the relationship between highway safety performance and roadway geometric design. The course will begin with a brief review of design factors and establishment of the roadway alignment. Topics addressed in greater depth include: cross-section elements, access management, and the relationship between geometric design and safety as well as traffic control.  An overview of modern highway safety analysis concepts, such as crash modification factors, safety performance functions, and safety analysis methods, will be discussed.  An introduction will preface the material, and a summary and review of available resources will be provided at the end of the day.

                                                                                                                Signals, Timings, Signs and Markings

                                                                                                                • 13.6 Contact Hours

                                                                                                                This course is designed to give the participants an understanding of the planning, design, capacity,  and operations of signalized intersections.  As the first step in the process for signalizing an intersection the type of data necessary to conduct an analysis will be reviewed.  During the second day of class the participants will collect intersection data including volume, turning movements, and delay at a nearby intersection.  A discussion of how to choose the type of traffic control device that should be installed will be reviewed.  This will include a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of each type of control as well as signal and stop sign warrants.  The class will be instructed on how to estimate the capacity of an intersection and how the signal timing will affect the capacity.  Software will be demonstrated to show how the timing for optimizing the operation of a signal can be determined.  At the end of the second day the MUTCD standards and guidelines for signal head location, markings, and signs will be reviewed.

                                                                                                                  Speed Management Techniques and Applications

                                                                                                                  The Speed Management Techniques and Applications Course is designed to provide participants with the knowledge and principles for applying various techniques for countering speeding and speed related crashes.  The first sections of the course review the Fatality Analysis Reporting System as well as other sources of crash data.  Methods for identifying potential hazardous areas related to crashes involving roadway departures, intersections, and bicycle and pedestrians are demonstrated.

                                                                                                                  A portion of the course is devoted to discuss and demonstrate methods for determining appropriate design and posted speeds.  The application of USLIMTS2 software is presented to the class for developing posted speed limit recommendations.

                                                                                                                  The course also reviews various speed reduction techniques that are applicable to rural and urban areas and reviews their effectiveness.  The countermeasures are categorized into three types of speed related crashes: 1. Road Departures; 2. Intersections; 3. Pedestrians & Bicyclists.   The class is asked to apply the appropriate techniques to a series of case studies.

                                                                                                                    Stormwater Management 1: Sediment and Erosion Control

                                                                                                                    Post Construction Stormwater Management in New Development and Redevelopment as well as Erosion & Sediment Control under the local regulations will be discussed. We will focus on structural and non-structural practices for water quality and water quantity both during construction and post construction. Whether your project is commercial, industrial or transportation based there are approved practices to select from. Costs of BMP’s will be discussed.

                                                                                                                      Stormwater Management 2: US DOA Grants and Mitigation - Half-Day

                                                                                                                      • 4 Contact Hours

                                                                                                                      (1/2 Day Workshop; 10:30am-3:00pm) The USDA Water & Waste Disposal Loan & Grant Program provides funding for clean and reliable drinking water systems, sanitary sewage disposal, sanitary solid waste disposal, and storm water drainage to households and businesses in eligible rural areas. At this half day workshop we will focus on the funds available for rural communities for storm water drainage. These funds are can be used for legal and engineering fees, permits and equipment, start-up operations and maintenance, purchase of facilities to improve service or prevent loss of service and other costs determined to be necessary for completion of the project

                                                                                                                        The Art of Writing for the Transportation Professional On-Line Course

                                                                                                                        • 8 Contact Hours

                                                                                                                        Designed for the professional interested in sharpening his or her technical writing ability, “The Art of Writing for Transportation Professionals” focuses on specific skills that can help anyone write more concisely and precisely. From the basics of sentence structures and punctuation to the use of more sophisticated syntax, each week’s lesson will address not only how to construct clear sentences but also why certain sentence structures lend more power to one’s writing. Because all writing must, in the end, satisfy an audience, this course will also cover how to edit, revise, and polish one’s writing, with a special emphasis on email etiquette. I hope to give you the skills to write with confidence and clarity.

                                                                                                                          Tort Liability

                                                                                                                          • 6.8 Contact Hours

                                                                                                                          This workshop provides an overview of the legal duties and responsibilities of roadway personnel. Key legal concepts relating to the liability of roadway agencies are reviewed from a risk management standpoint. Common types of claims/lawsuits brought against street departments and roadway agencies are identified through examples/case studies. Examples include traffic control devices, work zones, roadway and shoulder surface conditions, sight distance, and pedestrian incidents. Risk management principles, aimed at: (1) reducing/preventing crashes and claims and (2) helping agencies defend claims, will be highlighted. Practical risk management activities will be identified.

                                                                                                                            Traffic Calming

                                                                                                                            This course is intended to provide an overview of traffic calming and the tools needed to make decisions regarding applications. This one-day course on this topic provides a foundation in the evolution of traffic calming policies and practices. Detailed information on commonly-used traffic calming measures is then presented, addressing selection, design, effectiveness, and several case studies. The course concludes with a workshop and review of available resources.

                                                                                                                            Upon completion of this course, participants will be able to:

                                                                                                                            • Describe concepts and components in traffic calming plans and policies
                                                                                                                            • Select and design traffic calming measures
                                                                                                                            • Quantify the effectiveness of commonly-used traffic calming measures
                                                                                                                            • Develop a model policy and procedure for applying traffic calming measures

                                                                                                                              Transportation GIS (Geographic Information Systems)

                                                                                                                              Prerequisites:

                                                                                                                              • Students are to bring their own WiFi capable laptops to class
                                                                                                                              • ArcGIS Pro software should be installed and ready to use on student laptops
                                                                                                                              • Previous experience with ESRI’s ArcGIS Desktop software version 10.x

                                                                                                                              This course is geared towards the intermediate level GIS user who wants to learn more about the unique aspects and concepts of transportation GIS such as linear referencing and dynamic segmentation.  Students will be provided information in lecture format as well as have the opportunity to apply real world examples using ArcGIS software.  A number of federal and state transportation datasets will be shared and discussed, with students creating and publishing maps on the internet.

                                                                                                                              Notes:

                                                                                                                                Transportation GIS Overview: Free Introductory Webinar

                                                                                                                                Register now for a FREE 7 minute webinar overview of material to be presented at the one day, in-person training taking place on January 10th in Charlottesville – Transportation GIS – a hands-on workshop focused on transportation-based applications of the geographic information system software, ArcGIS.

                                                                                                                                  Unconventional Interchange and Intersection Design

                                                                                                                                  Many arterials and interchanges are terribly congested, and conventional measures offer little prospect for relief.  Unconventional designs offer some potential for relatively inexpensive improvements to those congested arterials and interchanges.  These are designs that have been used in some state or have been researched but have not been placed into widespread use.  Examples include the superstreets being installed in North Carolina, the median u-turns that Michigan has used for many years, and the diverging diamond interchanges that have recently opened in over 15 states.  In the right place with the details designed well, an unconventional design can deliver safety, efficiency, environmental, and cost benefits to motorists and transportation agencies.

                                                                                                                                  The purpose of this workshop will be to discuss the best of the unconventional intersection and interchange options in some depth.  We will explore the history, planning, design, and operation of the major designs.  By the end of the workshop students should understand which design has a realistic chance to help in a particular spot.

                                                                                                                                    VDOT Guardrail Installation Training (GRIT)

                                                                                                                                    • 6.8 Contact Hours

                                                                                                                                    VDOT Guardrail Installation Training (GRIT) is intended for Construction Inspectors and Highway/ Traffic Engineers who are involved with the design, construction, and inspection of guardrail and barrier systems.

                                                                                                                                    The course will educate the student on the best practice of selecting, designing, and constructing barrier systems.

                                                                                                                                      Winter Maintenance Operations

                                                                                                                                      Winter Road Maintenance operations are critical to the economic well-being and quality of life for Virginians all over the state. Instructor Tony DeCresie invites road supervisors, superintendents, public works and maintenance personnel, equipment operators, and city/town managers to a full-day workshop covering all aspects of winter road maintenance operations in Virginia.

                                                                                                                                      This newly updated course covers a wide range of topics critical for anyone responsible for winter road maintenance and snow operations including:

                                                                                                                                      • VDOT snow fighting policies and strategies
                                                                                                                                      • The appropriate snow and ice control equipment and techniques for proper treatment of road surfaces under varied conditions
                                                                                                                                      • “Best Practices” used by VDOT and local municipalities for Snow Operations
                                                                                                                                      • Distinguishing between safe and unsafe practices during snow operations
                                                                                                                                      • Off-Season Planning / Organizing / Preparations / Maintenance
                                                                                                                                      • Anti-Icing and De-Icing – strategies, techniques and materials – how and when to use them based on different road temperatures and conditions
                                                                                                                                      • Snow and Ice Control: Strategies, Techniques and Procedures
                                                                                                                                      • Snow Fighting Equipment: What’s being used, when to use it, and how to use it safely and effectively

                                                                                                                                      In addition to individual and group exercises and discussions – each attendee will receive valuable handouts and reference materials they can take home with them for future reference.